[Ausschnitte aus unbekannter Quelle]

Eingeklebter Zeitungsausschnitt
Schließen
Icon dass Zeitungsausschnitt symbolisiert
Aus:
Unbekannt.
Schließen
Icon dass Zitate symbolisiert

“FAMINE FEVER” IN LONDON.

Nov Anmerkung von Jenny Marx

We regret to learn that the number of cases of relapsing fever appears to be still on the increase in the metropolis, and we understand that, in view of meeting any exigency which may arise, a deputation from the managers of the Metropolitan Asylum Board waited upon the President of the Poor-law Board on Thursday, when it was arranged that negotiations should, if possible, be immediately concluded with the authorities of the Fever Hospital for the erection of a temporary building on the land belonging to the hospital, capable of containing sixty beds, that being the maximum addition for which there is room. It was also arranged that the managers should proceed immediately to enter into a provisional contract for the erection of another temporary building on one of the sites belonging to them, in case, as appears very probable, it should be found that further accommodation is afterwards required.

The re-appearance in this country of relapsing fever is a phenomenon which might have posited a moral if we had lately been indulging in boastfulness about our riches and prosperity. The wealthiest city in the world is threatened by a disease which implies chronic poverty, and is popularly known as “famine” fever. It is probably not indigenous in this island, but it certainly never makes way unless it finds conditions favourable to its progress. It searches out the weak and sickly in a population. Poland may be its birthplace; but the East-and of London would afford it no asylum if it did not find the same sort of grazing ground in Whitechapel as in the East of Europe. There is a moral as well as a physical element in it. It is not the bare want of food, but the hopelessness of earning food, which prepares the way for the fever’s ravages. Where body and mind are alike depressed, is its proper home. It is not easily dislodged, but it spreads over a wide extent of country. It ordinarily does not take away life, but it makes life seem not worth having, and it opens the door to mortal diseases.

Eingeklebter Zeitungsausschnitt
Schließen
Icon dass Zeitungsausschnitt symbolisiert
Aus:
Unbekannt.
Schließen
Icon dass Zitate symbolisiert

THE TREATMENT OF THE POOR IN ST. PANCRAS.

Yesterday, Dr. Lankester held two inquests at the College Arms, Crowndale-road, Camden-town, in cases bearing upon the administration of relief to the sick in St. Pancras workhouse. Several members of the new Board of Guardians were present, for the purpose of taking part in the proceedings should any evidence be given affecting them as a board. The first inquiry was on the body of Esther Wright, an infant, three weeks old, which was born in the workhouse, and whose mother prematurely left the house in consequence partly, as she alleged, of a neglect on the part of the workhouse authorities to supply the child with necessary nourishment. Sarah Wright, having been sworn, said she was confined in the workhouse. She was married. She left last Tuesday morning of her own accord. She was asked to stop longer on account of the child, but left because she thought it required more nourishment than she could get in the |39 house. She told the doctor and Mrs. Sanson on Sunday last that she had no milk to give the child, but they did not give her any till Monday night. She only got it then because the child cried so. She asked for milk at six o’clock on Monday evening, but did not get it till ten. Coroner—That is a distinct charge against the workhouse authorities. Witness—When I went out I got the child milk and port wine. I went for Dr. Harding, but he did not order anything, because the child was too far gone. Mr. Thomas Marsey Harding, surgeon, said—I was called on Wednesday last. The child was dying when I saw it. It was a very feeble child, and much emaciated. There were no marks of violence. It was clean and properly attended to on the part of the mother. I opened the body. There was dense congestion of the brain and of the lungs. The right side of the heart was glutted. Both sides contained black blood. The stomach contained milk and port wine. There was no sign of poison. There was plenty of chyle in the stomach. The cause of death was congestion of the brain and lungs. Coroner—Is it your impression that there was any neglect on the part of the mother? Witness—No; it was a disease of debility, which might have come on naturally in a feeble child, even if it were properly attended to. By a Juror—Port wine would not have brought this passive kind of congestion on. Susan Sanson, resident midwife of the workhouse, swore, in opposition to the mother of deceased, that the child had milk given it twice last Monday. She also said it was a “miserable little thing from its birth,” and “she never expected it to live.” Sarah Wright, recalled, denied that the child had milk twice on Monday. Milk was asked for at six in the evening, and was not obtained till 10, Susan Sanson re-called, said the mothers in the lying-in ward could have milk for their children when they liked. Mary Ann Brant, who appeared at one time to have been a very intelligent woman, but who is now extremely feeble in mind and body, said she was the nurse who supplied the milk to Sarah Wright twice on Monday. The Coroner said Sarah Wright had not substantiated the charge of neglect against the authorities, and the only consideration was whether she had any hand in the death of the child by going out before she ought. She gave it some port wine, and it was a question whether she did not give it too much; but Mr. Harding could not say she had. (Mr. Harding: No.) It was rather an early age to begin giving a child alcohol, and the mother ought not to have done it without the advice of a medical man. The Foreman of the Jury to Mrs. Sanson—How many patients have you to look after? Mrs. Sanson—We are rather slack now. I have 12 mothers and their infants at the present moment. Foreman—Are there any others besides the woman Brant to assist you? Witness—Yes, there are three others. Juror—I think our parish should put a more able person to wait upon the poor creatures in the lying-in ward than this aged and decrepit woman (Brant). If they are all like her I should not wonder at patients being unattended to. Witness, by Mr. Watkins, a guardian.—This woman has no laborious work to perform. Juror—The mother swore she did not get the milk till 10 o’clock at night, although she asked for it at six; and it struck me that if this was the old woman who had attended on her it was very likely to be as she stated. Mr. Smith, a guardian, said the midwife could have any assistance she liked, and if she did not have enough it was her own fault. A verdict of “Death from natural causes” was returned.

The second case was that of George Edwards, an aged inmate of the insane ward. Margaret Edwards, a very aged and infirm woman, said she was the widow of deceased. They had been in the workhouse 12 months last June. Coroner—Did they separate you? Witness—Oh, yes sir. Coroner—Oh, yes! But there is a law which says you should not be separated; and it is a much higher law than guardians’ law. Witness proceeded to say she saw her husband once a week. He always knew her, and would not hurt her. Mr. Blake, the master of the house, was very kind to them. She saw her husband alive for the last time on Wednesday week last, Robert Hunter, a helper in the insane ward, very tersely described the sudden death as it took place on Monday last. He said: “All of a sudden he threw himself back, and went off.” Dr. Ellis said death was caused by the rupture of a large vessel in the chest. A verdict of “Death from natural causes” was returned.

Inhalt:

  • Social cases. 1869