[Reynoldsʼs Newspaper, 25. Oktober und 29. November 1868]

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Reynoldsʼs Newspaper. Nr. 950, 25. Oktober 1868. S. 4.
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PLACING A PAUPER IN THE DEAD-HOUSE.

Mary Ann Smith, a strong and healthy-looking young woman, nineteen years of age, was charged, at Greenwich Police-court on Tuesday, with refractory conduct in Rotherhithe workhouse. Mr. Aylward, the master of the workhouse, said that one of the male inmates complained of not having been served with his tea, and it being the prisoner’s duty to provide him with it, he (the master) directed her to do so, but she refused, and became very impudent, upon which he ordered her to be placed in the refractory ward. The prisoner, when asked what she had to say in defence, said the master placed her in the dead-house, and asked, “Is that a place to put any one in, where they keep the dead bodies till they are taken away to be buried? Mr. Aylward said the building in which the refractory ward was situated was being altered, and there was no other place, except the dead-house, in which to confine persons like the prisoner; but no dead bodies had been placed there for the previous ten days. Mr. Boustred, the clerk, said the prisoner had once before been charged with refractory conduct. Mr. Patterson committed her to Wandsworth Gaol for ten days.



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Reynoldsʼs Newspaper. Nr. 955, 29. November 1868. S. 6.
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PRISONERS AND PAUPERS.—

On Monday afternoon Dr. Lankester, the coroner for Central Middlesex, held an inquest at the House of Correction, Coldbath-fields, respecting the death of John Ball, aged sixty-five, who on the 4th of August last was convicted and sentenced to two years’ imprisonment with hard labour for conspiring to defraud. Deceased had been a meat salesman in Newgate-market. On account of his age he was not put to hard labour. On the 4th instant he was attacked with a fainting fit while in chapel. He was removed to the infirmary, where he died on Thursday week. Dr. Smiles, the medical officer of the prison, said deceased appeared pale, as if through loss of blood. He was given three glasses of brandy daily for a time, and then six glasses of port wine instead. He died from degeneration of the heart. He said he was a moderate drinker, but Dr. Smiles thought he must have drunk a great deal. The coroner instanced a case in which a lady and gentleman were found dead who were stated to be “moderate drinkers,” whereas they had been in the habit of drinking four pints of spirits daily—gin, whisky and brandy. The new diet of the prisoners was referred to, when Dr. Smiles said the prisoners now had suet puddings. The coroner remarked that he had often said that the prisoners required more fat with their food. He had within the last three months held two inquests in that prison out of an average of 1,700 prisoners. A juror asked what the first-class diet was. Dr. Smiles replied that for four days in the week they had 4oz of meat for dinner, and on the other three days a pint of soup with potatoes. Each day they had 20oz of bread with cocoa for breakfast and gruel for supper. Independent of that they had suet pudding as stated. In feat, a surgeon in the neighbouring workhouse was surprised that the prisoners received so generous a diet. Dr. Lankester added that, as far as the diet was concerned, he would rather be prisoner than a pauper. Verdict—“Death from natural causes.”

Inhalt:

  • Social cases. 1869