[Reynoldsʼs Newspaper, 14. Februar und 11. April 1869]

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Reynoldsʼs Newspaper. Nr. 966, 14. Februar 1869. S. 6.
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MARYLEBONE.

xxxxx Anmerkung von Jenny Marx

DESTITUTION AND DESPERATION.—On Tuesday, Hannah Lee, aged 37, of 53, Hangton–street, Harrow-road, needlewoman, and the widow of a postman who died five years ago, was charged with attempting to commit suicide; also with attempting to deprive her child, Albert Lee, aged five and a half years, of its life, by administering laudanum to it. The landlady of the prisoner went to the room of the latter and found the door locked. Something was supposed to be wrong, and it was forced open. She then found the prisoner standing in the room, looking very wild and haggard. On being spoken to she fell, apparently stupefied. After she had been shaken and questioned she said she had taken laudanum. The witness saw the child with its face buried in the pillow, and asked her what was the matter with it. She replied he had had the draught as well. The witness, who saw two empty bottles on the able, ran out of the house and called a constable. The prisoner, on coming to himself, said it was hard to starve and see her child asking for bread which she could not give him. The witness told her that she ought to have let her know her state, and she would have had what she required. In reply to Mr. D’Eyncourt, witness said the prisoner was a hard-working, sober, and prudent woman. She was very fond of her child, and it surprised witness that she had attempted to take its life. Dr. Braythwaite Rogers said he was called in to see prisoner and her child, and found them both suffering from the poisonous effects of laudanum. He once administered what was requisite. In reply to questions, she told him distress and privation had driven her to commit the crime. She said her boy asked her that morning for breakfast, and she had none to give him. He cried, and having the poison, she gave him some and took some herself. She further said that she had bought the laudanum in small quantities at a time, and had kept it by her for more than two months. She had struggled “hard, very hard,” for employment, but could not succeed in getting any. The child vomited a good deal while he was in the room. She added that her husband had died very poor, and she had since got her living for herself and child by needlework and caring. There was not a particle of food or fire in the place. Mr. D’Eyncourt said it was a distressing case; but he must send her for trial for the attempt upon the life of her child. Prisoner begged not to be sent for trial. She only wanted work to maintain herself and her child. She did not wish for charity, but to maintain them both by her labour. The prisoner was committed to Newgate for trial.

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Reynoldsʼs Newspaper. Nr. 974, 11. April 1869. S. 5.
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BABY FARMING AT BOW.—

An investigation was held by Mr. Richards, on Thursday night, at the Lord Campbell tavern, Campbell-road, Bow, respecting the death of Frederick Wood, aged 2 years and 3 months. The proceedings attracted considerable interest in the neighbourhood, for it was known that out of 11 children that had resided at the baby farm 5 had died. Miss Annie Wood, 4, Nilein’s-street, Hexton, said that she was 23 years of age. She was the daughter of a shopkeeper. The deceased was a sickly child, and ten months ago witness took it to Mrs. Caroline Savill, of 24, Swayton-road, Bow. She paid her 4s. 6d. per week to take care of it. She thought it was thoroughly attended to, but she had not seen it for five weeks. Caroline Savill, 24, Swayton-road, Bow, said that she was the wife of an “agricultural manufacturer’s porter” in the City. The deceased had been with her ten months. She put it to bed at 9 o’clock on Saturday night and at half-past 8 o’clock on Sunday morning it was dead. When she was taking the deceased up to bed last October, she slipped on the stairs and fell upon the child. She was quite certain she was sober. It was a pair of old boots that caused the accident. She had eleven babies to keep at Bow. The pay ceases when a child dies. Mr. Edwards—Is your house a baby farm? Witness—I must leave that to the generosity of the jury. A Juror—The deceased was lying in an egg box with a little straw for a bed. Witness—The legs were drawn up. A Juror—The egg box was a short one and was sixteen inches wide. The child could not turn in it. By a Juror—Witness never tied the child’s legs together. She never discovered that the child’s thigh was broken until the morning she fell upon it. He cried, but she put him to bed. He fell upon the edge of the stairs, and her weight was upon him. She sent for a doctor next day.|

Inhalt:

  • Social cases. 1869